Tag Archives: progressive

The Complex Dialect

AltWire’s Indie Song of the Week

This week’s Indie Song of the Week is The Complex Dialect’s – “Looking For A Friend For The End Of World”.

The song centers around the importance of having true human connection, not only when times are good, but even in those last moments when human civilization could come to an end.

Smooth vibes connect with our ears giving the track a hunting vibe, as Lola Campbell expresses the longing for companionship in the last days.

 

The Complex Dialect

Seattle’s 8-Piece Progressive Outfit Complex Dialect – “Change”

Photo: Hanna Stevens

The Complex Dialect is an 8 piece progressive outfit homegrown from Seattle contributing an array of sounds engulfing the listener in a full blown musical experience. When it comes to their new release “Change” they hold back no punches not only expressing their inner selves musically but lyrically as well.

“Change” addresses problems (Side A) we face in our current political and societal atmosphere while also offering a solution (Side B) side to these issues we are plagued by. The Complex Dialect is a diverse group of individuals who touch on matters such race (Radar), the 1% (Capitalism), addiction (Fall), and inner struggles(No Man’s Land). These dilemmas mentioned are the main focus of (Side A: Problem) giving listeners a copious amount to absorb and process given the circumstances we are presented today.

 “Capitalism” is a track that guitarist Earnie Ashwood describes:

“Capitalism is about living in an economically unforgiving society that is controlled by corporations and the top 1%. The song calls out the external conditioning that creates said economic state while at the same time draws attention to the personal decisions we make that contributes to our own social economic oppression. The brands we buy, how we spend our currency (the most important currency being time), and how we constantly have our financial status on our minds are large contributors towards a system that strips away many of the qualities that make up our very humanity. The song is about taking a step outside of oneself and challenging the personal ignorance of the unwilling contributions one makes to their own personal subjugation.” – Earnie Ashwood

On the release of Change, he further states:

“Words will never be able to express what it means to us to be able to complete and share this album. From the beginning it has been our goal to provide a realistic perspective of where the world stands, and to provide connection and comfort in knowing that we all are not alone in facing challenging issues. It is our sincere hope that this album brings a sense of collective bonding, while providing a safe space for inner reflection and true personal change.” – Earnie Ashwood

The beauty of their album is they not only address problems and then leave the listener hanging, but they come together on (Side B: Solution) and give different  perspectives on how to bring the change we seek. The theme of oneness reigns supreme in “One Constellation” showing that differences can be set aside when we realize we all are from the same source. Side B reflects on the importance of our interactions with others and within ourselves.

The Complex Dialect displays the problems and solutions over a musical landscape infused with Rock, Jazz, Hip Hop, and Alternative organically producing an inventive sound.

Stand-Out Tracks:

“Rude”, “Looking For A Friend For The End Of The World”, “One Constellation”, “Radar”


You can purchase Change LP at: http://www.thecomplexdialect.com/store

[Concert Review] Coheed and Cambria: “Neverender GAIBSIV” tour

Coheed and Cambria performed 'Good Apollo I'm Burning Star IV, Volume 1: From Fear Through The Eyes of Madness' in its entirety.

I swear Neverenders never get old.

For those of you not familiar with Coheed and Cambria, a Neverender is exactly what it sounds like: It’s a concert where the band plays one (or a few) of their albums sequentially cover to cover. It’s a beautiful thing. If you’re like me and enjoy appreciating songs as part of the full picture of the album they were released on, it is a live music event dream come true!

In celebration of the 12th birthday of their most successful album, this year’s Neverender was a full play through of Good Apollo I’m Burning Star IV, Volume 1 : From Fear Through the Eyes of MadnessGAIBSIV was the band’s third studio release and is the proud holder of their mega-hit single “Welcome Home” (which I believe was required by law to be everyone’s Myspace profile song for at least 2 months back in 2005). GAIBSIV is a continuation of a story from the albums prior which chronicles The Amory Wars.  You can pick up companion copies of the companion comics for this album which are currently being released at BOOM! studios.

Opening for Coheed and Cambria was Rhode Island-based prog-rock band The Dear Hunter.  The band originated as a side project of Casey Crescenzo, formerly of The Receiving End of Sirens.  The band boasts and impressive discography of seven studio albums, a demo, two live albums and 13 EP’s.

The Dear Hunter put on an energetic and entertaining opening act despite a lack-luster (and honestly a little headache-inducing) light show accompaniment.  I was not previously familiar with the band’s music at all prior to seeing them perform at this show and was pleasantly surprised. Though I don’t know that I will be going out of my way any time soon to look up their full discography, I wouldn’t mind stumbling across them again on Pandora in the future. I do appreciate that they have an extensive storyline to tell across their albums in true prog-rock fashion, although I think I have my hands full enough following The Amory Wars at the moment.

I may be a little biased, but I do honestly believe that Coheed and Cambria consistently put on some of the best live shows. This year’s Neverender was no exception. The visuals on screen behind the band ranged from video clips to trippy, moving artwork and really added to the feel and experience of the full album. The energy from the band was high and engaging. Something about being able to anticipate the next song in the lineup also seems to really amp up the audience in a way that is incomparable to other concerts.

After the conclusion of GAIBSIV (including hidden track Bron-Y-Aur, a nod to Led Zepplin), the band ended the set with a three song encore that included “Island,” “Delirium Trigger” and “In Keeping Secrets of Silent Earth: 3.”

Coheed fans are an interesting group.  We refer to each other as Children of the Fence (COTF), a reference to Heaven’s Fence: The universe in which The Amory Wars takes place.  By the end of the encore, most of us in the back row had one arm around our neighbor and our other index finger up in the air during the lyric “we were one among The Fence.”

Overall, the show was phenomenal.  For those of you in Europe you can still get tickets to the European leg of the tour, which I highly recommend.